Testimonials Back

Click the photos below to learn how these teachers are using NGRID’s educational resources in their classrooms. If you would like to share your perspective on the NGRID program, we welcome your feedback!

Susan O'Connell
3rd Grade Teacher
Multi-Subject

Kelly Hall
4th Grade Teacher
Multi-Subject

Amy Lauer
7th Grade Teacher
Life Science

Cheryl Beck
4th Grade Teacher
Multi-Subject

Stephanie Doucette
7th Grade Teacher
General Science

Amy Steiger
4th Grade Teacher
Multi-Subject

Amy Steiger teaches 4th grade at Crisafulli School in Westford, MA.

Many valuable resources are available for teachers, students, and parents on the National Grid Ethics site. As a fourth grade teacher, I would use this site in my classroom for multiple purposes. The primary overview of the word “Ethics” on the page titled Understanding Ethics could be used at the beginning of the school year, when boundaries and classroom expectations are being established.

The Codes of Conduct page would be a great place to begin the school year. Classroom contracts could be created after this page was explored. As the year progresses, through community-building activities such as Responsive Classroom’s Morning Meeting and similar activities, each of the subsections of the site, such as Respect and Tolerance and Compassion and Community could be discussed. I would use this site as a whole-class lesson. While using a projector to display the page, focused class discussions would help to build community within any classroom. All teachers use community-building activities to some degree, and this site provides concrete, age-appropriate vocabulary definitions for more challenging topics.

The National Grid Ethics site is age-appropriate for grades four through seven or eight. Being a former middle school teacher, I believe it may benefit a health teacher or guidance counselor at this level. Students in seventh or eighth grade could access this site from home and respond to the discussion questions in a journal reflection, essay assignment, or the printable “Going Further” activities. Parents and families could also be involved in these home assignments. However, fourth or fifth graders would benefit from small group or whole class discourse with a teacher. An elementary guidance counselor would also find this website valuable and could use the different discussion activities in more focused small groups.

The graphics and design of the website are appealing. The set-up of the site is easy to navigate. Teachers will also benefit from the “Discussion Guides” available on the Teacher’s site. These provide a strong foundation for teachers to direct student comments and questions. Present in this site, but not often found in other social skills programs, is the discussion of “popular choices.” This site has a strong theme throughout for students to think about: “What is popular is not always right and what is right is not always popular.” This theme is unique to this website; it explores the idea of peer pressure without actually using those often overused words.